Author Topic: Aurthian Legend- How to summon a Faery  (Read 4766 times)

Dark Lord M
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Aurthian Legend- How to summon a Faery
« on: July 06, 2006, 05:21:19 pm »
I am reading an Aurthian legend book, the tales of King Arthur, (The old kind...) and they were meeting a band of thieves that were going to save some members from Morgan Le' Fay. (Queen of the Fay...) And they said that faeries have animal names such as Dog, Pig, Deer, etc... And if you do not point at the animal you speak of the Faeries will come, but will not show themselves, but will do mischief stuff as they always do.

I think its fiction, but who know, Aurthian Legends were written when Faery belief was still strong, so it could have some fact in it.

This might slow some of the questions on how to "summon a Faery."  <:smurf

Devious Viper
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Re: Aurthian Legend- How to summon a Faery
« Reply #1 on: July 06, 2006, 05:31:06 pm »
Reminds me of some English folklore... In certain places here, fisherman will not say "pig" and there is one village where NO ONE says "pig". Will see if I can find something about it (I tend to remember the salient points but forget the detail; its my age  :|)

Devious Viper
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Re: Aurthian Legend- How to summon a Faery
« Reply #2 on: July 06, 2006, 05:41:25 pm »
Quote from: North East Folklore Archive
For some unknown reason the trout seemed to be an omen of bad luck and one caught in a working boat’s net resulted in a bad fishing season. In fact there seems to be a few creatures within this category where even to mention the name is a sure sign of impending disaster. As Peter Buchan describes in his book, this led to names being changed thus a pig became a “grunter” or a "Sandy Campbell" or “Sonnie Cammie”; the salmon became a “reid fish” or simply “caul iron” and the rabbit became a “fower-fitter” or a “mappie”.

Read the article at http://www.nefa.net/archive/fishing/superstitions.htm

Quote from: Sailing Superstitions
There was a long list of taboo words which must never be uttered at sea: Pig, Egg, Cat, Knife, Hare, Church, Good-bye, Rat, Clergyman, Dog, Salt, and Rabbit. Each of these words had imaginative alternatives such as Grunter, Long-tail, and Bunny. If any forbidden word was uttered, bad luck could be averted by 'touching cold iron'. Landlubbers might 'touch wood' for protection; but aboard ship, iron had magical properties: 'Touch wood - no good / Touch iron - rely on'.

Read the article at http://www.hull.ac.uk/php/cetag/5bseadal.htm

I'm starting to think that the village that has a taboo on an animal name might actually refuse to say "rabbit", come to think of it.

Anyway, here's a link to a nice list of British superstitions

http://helpdesk.ebid.net/archive/index.php/t-33376.html

Dark Lord M
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Re: Aurthian Legend- How to summon a Faery
« Reply #3 on: July 06, 2006, 05:48:33 pm »
So there might be fact? Hmmm, thanks for that... It might settle some questions from some Faery lovers.  0-)

Devious Viper
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Re: Aurthian Legend- How to summon a Faery
« Reply #4 on: July 06, 2006, 05:52:55 pm »
Yes, there could well be a residual folk memory dating back to earlier beliefs and fears of the faeries. It is interesting to note that they insist on touching iron - traditionally deadly to the faerie folk.

Dark Lord M
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Re: Aurthian Legend- How to summon a Faery
« Reply #5 on: July 06, 2006, 06:10:15 pm »
That is something did stand oit but, isn't gold harmful to some them too? Anyway. I thought I should post because they got everything in the details right, including the other names for them. I suggest it, 'tis a fun read. Its' called the Once and Future King by T.H. White...

Devious Viper
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Re: Aurthian Legend- How to summon a Faery
« Reply #6 on: July 06, 2006, 06:44:24 pm »
One of my favourite novels.  :-)

Maggot Man
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Re: Aurthian Legend- How to summon a Faery
« Reply #7 on: July 07, 2006, 07:23:50 am »
Am I right in saying that some of the faery myths were inspired by surviving remants of the aborginal Pictish people that had been forced to seek refuge in the depths of the vast forests from the maruding incursions of later Cletic arrivals?

Dark Lord M
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Re: Aurthian Legend- How to summon a Faery
« Reply #8 on: July 07, 2006, 07:31:51 am »
Maggot this is true, that is one of the explanations that historians and folklorist have given. But the Picts were Celtic, so they were not hiding from the Celts. Some people think that the Faery were a race of people that orignally inhabitted Britian before the Romans and others arrived and inhabitted the country and the race was forced to live in the forrest and in hills and played tricks and kidnapped children to get back at the people who had stolen their homes, but what fun is that to not think of the Fay as supernatural creatures? :-D

Maggot Man
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Re: Aurthian Legend- How to summon a Faery
« Reply #9 on: July 07, 2006, 07:45:58 am »
Quote
But the Picts were Celtic, so they were not hiding from the Celts.

They were? Excuse my ignorance, but that is not something that I was aware of... Could you tell me more on this purpoted  link of kinship between the two peoples?

Quote
but what fun is that to not think of the Fay as supernatural creatures? grin

Well, I guess all those displaced juvenile teeth had to be dumped on someone willing to accept them..

Dark Lord M
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Re: Aurthian Legend- How to summon a Faery
« Reply #10 on: July 07, 2006, 08:27:27 am »
I think I got two things in my statesment wrong...

The Picts weren't the basis for all faeries, but were more likely used for the pixies. The pixi es seem to have a combo for two names Pict and Sídhe (which is the Irish word for faery or the hills in which they live in.) PictSídhe or Pixie, what you think of that?

Heres' a link to some of information

Also when reading the Pict information on wikipedia they lived in Scotland during Celtic times, but were not Celtic in nature.  :|

Anywhoo...

Devious Viper
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Re: Aurthian Legend- How to summon a Faery
« Reply #11 on: July 07, 2006, 08:39:11 am »
Squire explains it better:

Quote from: "Charles Squire, 'Celtic Myth & Legend'
The inhabitants of our islands previous to the Roman invasion are generally described as "Celts". But they must have been largely a mixed race; and the people with whom they mingled must have modified to some--and perhaps to a large--extent their physique, their customs, and their language.

Speculation has run somewhat wild over the question of the composition of the Early Britons. But out of the clash of rival theories there emerges one--and one only--which may be considered as scientifically established. We have certain proof of two distinct human stocks in the British Islands at the time of the Roman Conquest; and so great an authority as Professor Huxley has given his opinion that there is no evidence of any others.

The earliest of these two races would seem to have inhabited our islands from the most ancient times, and may, for our purpose, be described as aboriginal. It was the people that built the "long barrows"; and which is variously called by ethnologists the Iberian, Mediterranean, Berber, Basque, Silurian, or Euskarian race. In physique it was short, swarthy, dark-haired, dark-eyed, and long-skulled; its language belonged to the class called "Hamitic", the surviving types of which are found among the Gallas, Abyssinians, Berbers, and other North African tribes; and it seems to have come originally from some part either of Eastern, Northern, or Central Africa. Spreading thence, it was probably the first people to inhabit the Valley of the Nile, and it sent offshoots into Syria and Asia Minor. The earliest Hellenes found it in Greece under the name of "Pelasgoi"; the earliest Latins in Italy, as the "Etruscans"; and the Hebrews in Palestine, as the "Hittites". It spread northward through Europe as far as the Baltic, and westward, along the Atlas chain, to Spain, France, and our own islands. 1 In many countries it reached a comparatively high level of civilization, but in Britain its development must have been early checked. We can discern it as an agricultural rather than a pastoral people, still in the Stone Age, dwelling in totemistic tribes on hills whose summits it fortified elaborately, and whose slopes it cultivated on what is called the "terrace system", and having a primitive culture which ethnologists think to have much resembled that of the present hill-tribes of Southern India. 2 It held our islands till the coming of the Celts, who fought with the aborigines, dispossessed them of the more fertile parts, subjugated them, even amalgamated with them, but certainly never extirpated them. In the time of the Romans they were still practically independent in South Wales. In Ireland they were long unconquered, and are found as allies rather than serfs of the Gaels, ruling their own provinces, and preserving their own customs and religion. Nor, in spite of all the successive invasions of Great Britain and Ireland, are they yet extinct, or so merged as to have lost their type, which is still the predominant one in many parts of the west both of Britain and Ireland, and is believed by some ethnologists to be generally upon the increase all over England.

The second of the two races was the exact opposite to the first. It was the tall, fair, light-haired, blue- or gray-eyed, broad-headed people called, popularly, the "Celts", who belonged in speech to the "Aryan" family, their language finding its affinities in Latin, Greek, Teutonic, Slavic, the Zend of Ancient Persia, and the Sanscrit of Ancient India. Its original home was probably somewhere in Central Europe, along the course of the upper Danube, or in the region of the Alps. The "round barrows" in which it buried its dead, or deposited their burnt ashes, differ in shape from the "long barrows" of the earlier race. It was in a higher stage of culture than the "Iberians", and introduced into Britain bronze and silver, and, perhaps, some of the more lately domesticated animals.

Both Iberians and Celts were divided into numerous tribes, but there is nothing to show that there was any great diversity among the former. It is otherwise with the Celts, who were separated into two main branches which came over at different times. The earliest were the Goidels, or Gaels; the second, the Brythons, or Britons. Between these two branches there was not only a dialectical, but probably, also, a considerable physical difference. Some anthropologists even postulate a different shape of skull. Without necessarily admitting this, there is reason to suppose a difference of build and of colour of hair.